Breast Augmentation: Four Important Decisions

Breast augmentation has been around for over 50 years and is still the most popular cosmetic surgical procedure. According to statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, there were almost 300,000 breast augmentations performed in the U.S. in 2013. Breast implant technique improves year after year, producing remarkably natural results. It is still, however, an important choice. We encourage patients to give very careful consideration to four important decisions.

Should I choose saline or silicone implants?

There have been exciting advancements recently in the development of breast implants in size, profile, texture and composition of the implant itself. Patients have numerous implant options that have all been tested for both safety and efficacy.

In 2013, 72% of patients chose silicone implants. Silicone implants, including the newest cohesive gel or ?gummy bear? implants, offer a lighter, softer more natural feel. There is also a lower deflation rate and less rippling. Silicone breast implants are slightly more expensive than saline implants for breast augmentation.

Saline implants offer a great alternative for patients who want a slightly smaller incision because they are inserted into the breast empty. Saline implants also cost slightly less. You, as the patient, are the final and most important decision maker. You need to be comfortable with your choice of saline or silicone breast implants.

What kind of incision is best?

Although breast augmentation surgery is broadly accepted today, many patients prefer to keep their surgery private. They may concerns about the size and location of the incision. With many advancements in breast surgery techniques and products, the appearance of scars in breast augmentation have been significantly reduced. Although there are different standard incision approaches in breast augmentation surgery, most plastic surgeons prefer the incision which is under the breast fold called inframmary, around the areola, called peri-aureolar or under the armpit, called trans-axillary. Dr. Gray mostly performs the peri-aureolar incision, but will use the inframmary when appropriate. He will discuss which incision approach is best for your body, implant selection and lifestyle.

What size implant is the best for my body?

Determining size is no doubt the largest cause of anxiety for patients seeking breast augmentation. “What will I look like?” is the number one question patients ask Dr. Lawrence Gray when considering breast augmentation. Dr. Gray, can accurately answer this question in 3D pictorial form. The Portrait 3D gives patients an actual visual of themselves simulating the before and after in photo realistic 3D. The breast imager compares the “before” with up to 5 simulated results and helps Dr. Gray and you work together to select just the right implant?size, form and shape, that best compliments their individual body. It allows greater guidance and direction for more accurate customization, and placement and shaping of the implants. It also enables patients to see the desired outcome in realistic 3D from all angles – overhead, side, front views, before the procedure is performed and make any necessary adjustments. Dr. Gray offers breast imaging at no extra charge as part of the consultation.

How do I pick the best plastic surgeon?

The final and perhaps most important factor when considering breast augmentation is selecting the plastic surgeon to perform the procedure. The surgeon should be certified American Board of Medical Specialties in plastic surgery and should be a member in good standing of professional organizations such as the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Your plastic surgeon should also be fully licensed by the state in which he or she practices. Find Your Surgeon

It is very important for patients to have view to numerous before and after photos online or in the office so they can see the plastic surgeon?s results. Many people place great importance on direct recommendations about at surgeon?s work that they have heard from friends or family, especially if they have had the same procedure done.